35 Candlestick Chart Patterns

Candlestick charts patterns shows the security’s open, high, low, and close price for the day. Candlestick charts patterns give us powerful signals to identify trading patterns. Candlesticks charts patterns help technical analyst set up their trades candlestick patterns are used for predicting the future direction of the price movements. The thin vertical lines above and below the real body is knowns as the wicks. Wicks represents the high and low prices of the trading session. Candlestick Chart Patterns are classified into Continuation Patterns, Bullish Reversal Candlestick Patterns and Bearish Reversal Patterns.

35 Candlestick Chart Patterns

Candlestick Chart Patterns in the Stock Market

1Hammer Candlestick Patterns
2Piercing Pattern Candlestick Patterns
3Bullish Engulfing Candlestick Patterns
4Morning Star Candlestick Patterns
5Three White Soldiers Candlestick Patterns
6Marubozu Candlestick Patterns
7Three Inside Up Candlestick Patterns
8Bullish Harami Candlestick Patterns
9Tweezer Bottom Candlestick Patterns
10Inverted Hammer Candlestick Patterns
11Three Outside Up Candlestick Patterns
12OnNeck Candlestick Patterns
13Bullish Counterattack Candlestick Patterns
14Hanging man Candlestick Patterns
15Dark cloud Candlestick Patterns
16Bearish Engulfing Candlestick Patterns
17Evening Star Candlestick Patterns
18Three Black Crows Candlestick Patterns
19Black Marubozu Candlestick Patterns
20Three Inside Down Candlestick Patterns
21Bearish Harami Candlestick Patterns
22Shooting Star Candlestick Patterns
23Tweezer Top Candlestick Patterns
24Three Outside Down Candlestick Patterns
25Bearish Counterattack Candlestick Patterns
26Doji Candlestick Patterns
27Spinning Top Candlestick Patterns
28Falling Three Methods Candlestick Patterns
29Rising Three Methods Candlestick Patterns
30Upside Tasuki Candlestick Patterns
31Downside Tasuki Candlestick Patterns
32Mat Hold Candlestick Patterns
33Rising Window Candlestick Patterns
34Falling Window Candlestick Patterns
35High Wave Candlestick Patterns

1 Hammer Candlestick Patterns – A hammer candlestick pattern is a bullish reversal pattern that occurs after a downtrend. It is called a hammer because it looks like a hammer with a handle, with the body of the candlestick being the handle and the wick being the hammer head.
The hammer candlestick pattern is formed when the open, low, and close prices are almost at the same level, with the close price being slightly higher than the open price. The wick, or shadow, of the candlestick should be at least twice as long as the body, with the wick at the bottom of the candlestick indicating that buyers were able to push the price up from the low and close above the open. This indicates that there was strong buying pressure and that the downtrend may be coming to an end.It is important to note that the hammer candlestick pattern is not a standalone signal, and should be confirmed by other technical indicators or chart patterns before making any trading decisions. It is also important to consider the overall trend and context of the market when interpreting the meaning of a hammer candlestick pattern.

2 Piercing Pattern Candlestick Patterns – The piercing pattern is a bullish reversal pattern that occurs after a downtrend. It is called a piercing pattern because it involves the price of the security “piercing” through a key level of resistance.To form a piercing pattern, the first candlestick should be a long black candlestick that represents a downtrend. The second candlestick should be a white candlestick that opens below the close of the previous black candlestick, but then closes above the midpoint of the black candlestick’s body. This indicates that buyers were able to push the price up significantly from the open and that there was a shift in sentiment from bearish to bullish.Like the hammer candlestick pattern, the piercing pattern is not a standalone signal and should be confirmed by other technical indicators or chart patterns before making any trading decisions. It is also important to consider the overall trend and context of the market when interpreting the meaning of a piercing pattern.

3 Bullish Engulfing Candlestick Patterns – The bullish engulfing pattern is a bullish reversal pattern that occurs after a downtrend. It is called a bullish engulfing pattern because the second candlestick completely “engulfs” the body of the first candlestick, meaning that it opens at a price lower than the close of the first candlestick and closes at a price higher than the open of the first candlestick.To form a bullish engulfing pattern, the first candlestick should be a black or red candlestick that represents a downtrend. The second candlestick should be a white or green candlestick that opens below the close of the previous black candlestick and then closes above the open of the black candlestick. This indicates that there was a strong shift in sentiment from bearish to bullish, with buyers being able to push the price up significantly from the open.Like the hammer and piercing patterns, the bullish engulfing pattern is not a standalone signal and should be confirmed by other technical indicators or chart patterns before making any trading decisions. It is also important to consider the overall trend and context of the market when interpreting the meaning of a bullish engulfing pattern

4 Morning Star Candlestick Patterns – The morning star candlestick pattern is a bullish reversal pattern that occurs after a downtrend. It is called a morning star pattern because it is typically thought to be a sign of hope or a new beginning, similar to the appearance of a morning star in the sky.To form a morning star pattern, there should be three consecutive candlesticks. The first candlestick should be a long black or red candlestick that represents a downtrend. The second candlestick should be a small-bodied candlestick that opens within the body of the first candlestick and closes near the midpoint of the first candlestick’s body. This small-bodied candlestick is called the “doji,” and it indicates indecision or a lack of momentum in the market. The third candlestick should be a white or green candlestick that opens above the close of the doji and closes above the open of the first candlestick. This indicates that buyers were able to push the price up significantly from the open, suggesting a shift in sentiment from bearish to bullish.Like the other candlestick patterns mentioned, the morning star pattern is not a standalone signal and should be confirmed by other technical indicators or chart patterns before making any trading decisions. It is also important to consider the overall trend and context of the market when interpreting the meaning of a morning star pattern.

5 Three White Soldiers Candlestick Patterns – The three white soldiers candlestick pattern is a bullish reversal pattern that occurs after a downtrend. It is called the three white soldiers pattern because it consists of three long white candlesticks that open above the previous day’s close and close at or near their highs.To form a three white soldiers pattern, the first candlestick should be a long white or green candlestick that opens above the close of the previous black or red candlestick and closes at or near its high. The second and third candlesticks should also be long white or green candlesticks that open above the close of the previous day’s candlestick and close at or near their highs. This indicates that there is strong buying pressure and that the downtrend may be coming to an end.Like the other candlestick patterns mentioned, the three white soldiers pattern is not a standalone signal and should be confirmed by other technical indicators or chart patterns before making any trading decisions. It is also important to consider the overall trend and context of the market when interpreting the meaning of a three white soldiers pattern.

6 Marubozu Candlestick Patterns – A Marubozu candlestick is a type of candlestick chart pattern that has a long, solid body with no wicks or shadows. It is called a Marubozu, which means “bald” or “shaved” in Japanese, because it lacks the wicks or shadows that are typically found on other candlestick patterns.
There are two types of Marubozu candlesticks: white Marubozu and black Marubozu. A white Marubozu candlestick is formed when the open price is the low price and the close price is the high price, indicating that buyers were in control of the market throughout the entire period. A black Marubozu candlestick is formed when the open price is the high price and the close price is the low price, indicating that sellers were in control of the market throughout the entire period.The Marubozu candlestick pattern is typically seen as a strong trend continuation signal, as it indicates a clear shift in sentiment from bullish to bearish or vice versa. However, it is important to note that the Marubozu candlestick pattern is not a standalone signal and should be confirmed by other technical indicators or chart patterns before making any trading decisions. It is also important to consider the overall trend and context of the market when interpreting the meaning of a Marubozu candlestick pattern.

7 Three Inside Up Candlestick Patterns – The three inside up candlestick pattern is a bullish reversal pattern that occurs after a downtrend. It is called a three inside up pattern because it consists of three consecutive candlesticks, with the second candlestick being contained within the range of the first candlestick and the third candlestick breaking above the high of the first candlestick.To form a three inside up pattern, the first candlestick should be a long black or red candlestick that represents a downtrend. The second candlestick should be a white or green candlestick that opens within the body of the first candlestick and closes above the midpoint of the first candlestick’s body. The third candlestick should also be a white or green candlestick that opens above the close of the second candlestick and closes above the high of the first candlestick. This indicates that there was a shift in sentiment from bearish to bullish, with buyers being able to push the price up significantly from the open.Like the other candlestick patterns mentioned, the three inside up pattern is not a standalone signal and should be confirmed by other technical indicators or chart patterns before making any trading decisions. It is also important to consider the overall trend and context of the market when interpreting the meaning of a three inside up pattern.

8 Bullish Harami Candlestick Patterns – The bullish harami candlestick pattern is a bullish reversal pattern that occurs after a downtrend. It is called a bullish harami pattern because the second candlestick is “pregnant” or “enclosed” within the body of the first candlestick, similar to the Japanese word “harami” which means “pregnant.” To form a bullish harami pattern, the first candlestick should be a long black or red candlestick that represents a downtrend. The second candlestick should be a white or green candlestick that opens above the close of the previous black candlestick and closes within the body of the black candlestick. This indicates that there was a shift in sentiment from bearish to bullish, with buyers being able to push the price up from the open, but not enough to close above the high of the black candlestick. Like the other candlestick patterns mentioned, the bullish harami pattern is not a standalone signal and should be confirmed by other technical indicators or chart patterns before making any trading decisions. It is also important to consider the overall trend and context of the market when interpreting the meaning of a bullish harami pattern.

9 Tweezer Bottom Candlestick Patterns – The tweezer bottom candlestick pattern is a bullish reversal pattern that occurs after a downtrend. It is called a tweezer bottom pattern because it looks like a pair of tweezers, with the two candlesticks having matching lows.To form a tweezer bottom pattern, there should be two consecutive candlesticks with matching lows. The first candlestick can be either black or white and represents a downtrend. The second candlestick should be a white or green candlestick that opens above the close of the previous black candlestick and closes above the midpoint of the black candlestick’s body. This indicates that there was a shift in sentiment from bearish to bullish, with buyers being able to push the price up significantly from the open.Like the other candlestick patterns mentioned, the tweezer bottom pattern is not a standalone signal and should be confirmed by other technical indicators or chart patterns before making any trading decisions. It is also important to consider the overall trend and context of the market when interpreting the meaning of a tweezer bottom pattern.

10 Inverted Hammer Candlestick Patterns – The inverted hammer candlestick pattern is a bullish reversal pattern that occurs after a downtrend. It is called an inverted hammer pattern because it looks like an inverted hammer, with the body of the candlestick being the handle and the wick being the hammer head. The inverted hammer candlestick pattern is formed when the open, low, and close prices are almost at the same level, with the close price being slightly lower than the open price. The wick, or shadow, of the candlestick should be at least twice as long as the body, with the wick at the top of the candlestick indicating that sellers were able to push the price down from the high, but buyers were able to push the price back up and close above the open. This indicates that there was strong buying pressure and that the downtrend may be coming to an end. It is important to note that the inverted hammer candlestick pattern is not a standalone signal, and should be confirmed by other technical indicators or chart patterns before making any trading decisions. It is also important to consider the overall trend and context of the market when interpreting the meaning of an inverted hammer candlestick pattern.

11 Three Outside Up Candlestick Patterns – The three outside up candlestick pattern is a bullish reversal pattern that occurs after a downtrend. It is called a three outside up pattern because it consists of three consecutive candlesticks, with the second candlestick breaking above the high of the first candlestick and the third candlestick breaking above the high of the second candlestick.To form a three outside up pattern, the first candlestick should be a long black or red candlestick that represents a downtrend. The second candlestick should be a white or green candlestick that opens within the body of the first candlestick and closes above the high of the first candlestick. The third candlestick should also be a white or green candlestick that opens above the close of the second candlestick and closes above the high of the second candlestick. This indicates that there was a strong shift in sentiment from bearish to bullish, with buyers being able to push the price up significantly from the open.Like the other candlestick patterns mentioned, the three outside up pattern is not a standalone signal and should be confirmed by other technical indicators or chart patterns before making any trading decisions. It is also important to consider the overall trend and context of the market when interpreting the meaning of a three outside up pattern.

12 OnNeck Candlestick Patterns – The on-neck candlestick pattern is a bearish reversal pattern that occurs after an uptrend. It is called an on-neck pattern because it consists of two candlesticks, with the second candlestick’s low being close to the first candlestick’s high, creating the appearance of a neck.To form an on-neck pattern, the first candlestick should be a long white or green candlestick that represents an uptrend. The second candlestick should be a black or red candlestick that opens above the high of the previous white candlestick and closes below the midpoint of the white candlestick’s body. This indicates that there was a shift in sentiment from bullish to bearish, with sellers being able to push the price down significantly from the open.Like the other candlestick patterns mentioned, the on-neck pattern is not a standalone signal and should be confirmed by other technical indicators or chart patterns before making any trading decisions. It is also important to consider the overall trend and context of the market when interpreting the meaning of an on-neck pattern.

13 Bullish Counterattack Candlestick Patterns – The bullish counterattack candlestick pattern is a bullish reversal pattern that occurs after a downtrend. It is called a bullish counterattack pattern because it consists of two candlesticks, with the second candlestick “counterattacking” the downtrend represented by the first candlestick. To form a bullish counterattack pattern, the first candlestick should be a long black or red candlestick that represents a downtrend. The second candlestick should be a white or green candlestick that opens below the close of the previous black candlestick and closes above the midpoint of the black candlestick’s body. This indicates that there was a shift in sentiment from bearish to bullish, with buyers being able to push the price up significantly from the open. Like the other candlestick patterns mentioned, the bullish counterattack pattern is not a standalone signal and should be confirmed by other technical indicators or chart patterns before making any trading decisions. It is also important to consider the overall trend and context of the market when interpreting the meaning of a bullish counterattack pattern.

14 Hanging man Candlestick Patterns – The hanging man candlestick pattern is a bearish reversal pattern that occurs after an uptrend. It is called a hanging man pattern because it looks like a person hanging from a gallows, with the body of the candlestick being the person and the wick being the rope. The hanging man candlestick pattern is formed when the open, high, and close prices are almost at the same level, with the close price being slightly lower than the open price. The wick, or shadow, of the candlestick should be at least twice as long as the body, with the wick at the top of the candlestick indicating that sellers were able to push the price down from the high and close below the open. This indicates that there was strong selling pressure and that the uptrend may be coming to an end. It is important to note that the hanging man candlestick pattern is not a standalone signal, and should be confirmed by other technical indicators or chart patterns before making any trading decisions. It is also important to consider the overall trend and context of the market when interpreting the meaning of a hanging man candlestick pattern.

15 Dark cloud Candlestick Patterns – The dark cloud candlestick pattern is a bearish reversal pattern that occurs after an uptrend. It is called a dark cloud pattern because the second candlestick looks like a dark cloud that is covering the first candlestick, which represents the sun. To form a dark cloud pattern, the first candlestick should be a long white or green candlestick that represents an uptrend. The second candlestick should be a black or red candlestick that opens above the high of the previous white candlestick, but then closes below the midpoint of the white candlestick’s body. This indicates that there was a shift in sentiment from bullish to bearish, with sellers being able to push the price down significantly from the open. Like the other candlestick patterns mentioned, the dark cloud pattern is not a standalone signal and should be confirmed by other technical indicators or chart patterns before making any trading decisions. It is also important to consider the overall trend and context of the market when interpreting the meaning of a dark cloud pattern.

16 Bearish Engulfing Candlestick Patterns – The bearish engulfing pattern is a bearish reversal pattern that occurs after an uptrend. It is called a bearish engulfing pattern because the second candlestick completely “engulfs” the body of the first candlestick, meaning that it opens at a price higher than the close of the first candlestick and closes at a price lower than the open of the first candlestick.To form a bearish engulfing pattern, the first candlestick should be a white or green candlestick that represents an uptrend. The second candlestick should be a black or red candlestick that opens above the close of the previous white candlestick and then closes below the open of the white candlestick. This indicates that there was a strong shift in sentiment from bullish to bearish, with sellers being able to push the price down significantly from the open. Like the hammer and piercing patterns, the bearish engulfing pattern is not a standalone signal and should be confirmed by other technical indicators or chart patterns before making any trading decisions. It is also important to consider the overall trend and context of the market when interpreting the meaning of a bearish engulfing pattern.

17 Evening Star Candlestick Patterns – The evening star candlestick pattern is a bearish reversal pattern that occurs after an uptrend. It is called an evening star pattern because it is typically thought to be a sign of the end of the day or a period of decline, similar to the appearance of an evening star in the sky. To form an evening star pattern, there should be three consecutive candlesticks. The first candlestick should be a long white or green candlestick that represents an uptrend. The second candlestick should be a small-bodied candlestick that opens within the body of the first candlestick and closes near the midpoint of the first candlestick’s body. This small-bodied candlestick is called the “doji,” and it indicates indecision or a lack of momentum in the market. The third candlestick should be a black or red candlestick that opens below the close of the doji and closes below the open of the first candlestick. This indicates that sellers were able to push the price down significantly from the open, suggesting a shift in sentiment from bullish to bearish. Like the other candlestick patterns mentioned, the evening star pattern is not a standalone signal and should be confirmed by other technical indicators or chart patterns before making any trading decisions. It is also important to consider the overall trend and context of the market when interpreting the meaning of an evening star pattern.

18 Three Black Crows Candlestick Patterns – The three black crows candlestick pattern is a bearish reversal pattern that occurs after an uptrend. It is called a three black crows pattern because it consists of three consecutive long black or red candlesticks that open within the body of the previous day’s candlestick and close at or near their lows. To form a three black crows pattern, the first candlestick should be a long white or green candlestick that represents an uptrend. The second and third candlesticks should also be long black or red candlesticks that open within the body of the previous day’s candlestick and close at or near their lows. This indicates that there is strong selling pressure and that the uptrend may be coming to an end. Like the other candlestick patterns mentioned, the three black crows pattern is not a standalone signal and should be confirmed by other technical indicators or chart patterns before making any trading decisions. It is also important to consider the overall trend and context of the market when interpreting the meaning of a three black crows pattern.

19 Black Marubozu Candlestick Patterns – A black Marubozu candlestick is a type of candlestick chart pattern that has a long, solid black body with no wicks or shadows. It is called a Marubozu, which means “bald” or “shaved” in Japanese, because it lacks the wicks or shadows that are typically found on other candlestick patterns. A black Marubozu candlestick is formed when the open price is the high price and the close price is the low price, indicating that sellers were in control of the market throughout the entire period. This can be seen as a strong bearish signal, as it indicates a clear shift in sentiment from bullish to bearish. It is important to note that the black Marubozu candlestick pattern is not a standalone signal and should be confirmed by other technical indicators or chart patterns before making any trading decisions. It is also important to consider the overall trend and context of the market when interpreting the meaning of a black Marubozu candlestick pattern.

20 Three Inside Down Candlestick Patterns – The three inside down candlestick pattern is a bearish reversal pattern that occurs after an uptrend. It is called a three inside down pattern because it consists of three consecutive candlesticks, with the second candlestick being contained within the range of the first candlestick and the third candlestick breaking below the low of the first candlestick. To form a three inside down pattern, the first candlestick should be a long white or green candlestick that represents an uptrend. The second candlestick should be a black or red candlestick that opens within the body of the first candlestick and closes below the midpoint of the first candlestick’s body. The third candlestick should also be a black or red candlestick that opens below the close of the second candlestick and closes below the low of the first candlestick. This indicates that there was a shift in sentiment from bullish to bearish, with sellers being able to push the price down significantly from the open. Like the other candlestick patterns mentioned, the three inside down pattern is not a standalone signal and should be confirmed by other technical indicators or chart patterns before making any trading decisions. It is also important to consider the overall trend and context of the market when interpreting the meaning of a three inside down pattern.

21 Bearish Harami Candlestick Patterns – The bearish harami candlestick pattern is a bearish reversal pattern that occurs after an uptrend. It is called a bearish harami pattern because the second candlestick is “pregnant” or “enclosed” within the body of the first candlestick, similar to the Japanese word “harami” which means “pregnant.” To form a bearish harami pattern, the first candlestick should be a long white or green candlestick that represents an uptrend. The second candlestick should be a black or red candlestick that opens within the body of the previous white candlestick and closes below the midpoint of the white candlestick’s body. This indicates that there was a shift in sentiment from bullish to bearish, with sellers being able to push the price down from the open, but not enough to close below the low of the white candlestick. Like the other candlestick patterns mentioned, the bearish harami pattern is not a standalone signal and should be confirmed by other technical indicators or chart patterns before making any trading decisions. It is also important to consider the overall trend and context of the market when interpreting the meaning of a bearish harami pattern.

22 Shooting Star Candlestick Patterns – The shooting star candlestick pattern is a bearish reversal pattern that occurs after an uptrend. It is called a shooting star pattern because it looks like a shooting star, with the body of the candlestick being the tail of the star and the wick being the shooting part of the star. The shooting star candlestick pattern is formed when the open, high, and close prices are almost at the same level, with the close price being slightly lower than the open price. The wick, or shadow, of the candlestick should be at least twice as long as the body, with the wick at the top of the candlestick indicating that sellers were able to push the price down from the high, but buyers were able to push the price back up and close above the open. This indicates that there was strong selling pressure and that the uptrend may be coming to an end. It is important to note that the shooting star candlestick pattern is not a standalone signal, and should be confirmed by other technical indicators or chart patterns before making any trading decisions. It is also important to consider the overall trend and context of the market when interpreting the meaning of a shooting star candlestick pattern.

23 Tweezer Top Candlestick Patterns – The tweezer top candlestick pattern is a bearish reversal pattern that occurs after an uptrend. It is called a tweezer top pattern because it looks like a pair of tweezers, with the two candlesticks having almost the same high prices and representing the jaws of the tweezers. To form a tweezer top pattern, the first candlestick should be a long white or green candlestick that represents an uptrend. The second candlestick should be a black or red candlestick that also has a long body and opens within the body of the previous white candlestick, but closes below the midpoint of the white candlestick’s body. This indicates that there was a shift in sentiment from bullish to bearish, with sellers being able to push the price down significantly from the open. Like the other candlestick patterns mentioned, the tweezer top pattern is not a standalone signal and should be confirmed by other technical indicators or chart patterns before making any trading decisions. It is also important to consider the overall trend and context of the market when interpreting the meaning of a tweezer top pattern.

24 Three Outside Down Candlestick Patterns – The three outside down candlestick pattern is a bearish reversal pattern that occurs after an uptrend. It is called a three outside down pattern because it consists of three consecutive candlesticks, with the second candlestick breaking below the low of the first candlestick and the third candlestick breaking below the low of the second candlestick.To form a three outside down pattern, the first candlestick should be a long white or green candlestick that represents an uptrend. The second candlestick should be a black or red candlestick that opens within the body of the first candlestick and closes below the low of the first candlestick. The third candlestick should also be a black or red candlestick that opens below the close of the second candlestick and closes below the low of the second candlestick. This indicates that there was a strong shift in sentiment from bullish to bearish, with sellers being able to push the price down significantly from the open. Like the other candlestick patterns mentioned, the three outside down pattern is not a standalone signal and should be confirmed by other technical indicators or chart patterns before making any trading decisions. It is also important to consider the overall trend and context of the market when interpreting the meaning of a three outside down pattern.

25 Bearish Counterattack Candlestick Patterns – The bearish counterattack candlestick pattern is a bearish reversal pattern that occurs after a downtrend. It is called a bearish counterattack pattern because it consists of two candlesticks, with the second candlestick “counterattacking” the downtrend represented by the first candlestick. To form a bearish counterattack pattern, the first candlestick should be a long black or red candlestick that represents a downtrend. The second candlestick should be a white or green candlestick that opens below the close of the previous black candlestick and closes above the midpoint of the black candlestick’s body. This indicates that there was a shift in sentiment from bearish to bullish, with buyers being able to push the price up significantly from the open. Like the other candlestick patterns mentioned, the bearish counterattack pattern is not a standalone signal and should be confirmed by other technical indicators or chart patterns before making any trading decisions. It is also important to consider the overall trend and context of the market when interpreting the meaning of a bearish counterattack pattern.

26 Doji Candlestick Patterns – A doji candlestick is a type of chart pattern that appears on a candlestick chart. It is called a doji because it looks like a cross or “T,” with the body of the candlestick being extremely small or non-existent. Doji candlesticks are considered to be a sign of indecision or a lack of momentum in the market. There are several types of doji candlesticks, including the long-legged doji, the dragonfly doji, the gravestone doji, and the four-price doji. The long-legged doji has long wicks or shadows on both sides, indicating that there was significant buying and selling activity, but the price ended up closing at or near the open. The dragonfly doji has a long wick on the bottom and a small or non-existent body, indicating that the price opened at the high and then fell, but buyers were able to push the price back up and close at or near the open. The gravestone doji has a long wick on the top and a small or non-existent body, indicating that the price opened at the low and then rose, but sellers were able to push the price back down and close at or near the open. The four-price doji has no wicks or shadows and indicates that the open, high, low, and close prices were all the same, indicating a complete lack of price movement. It is important to note that doji candlesticks are not a standalone signal and should be confirmed by other technical indicators or chart patterns before making any trading decisions. It is also important to consider the overall trend and context of the market when interpreting the meaning of a doji

27 Spinning Top Candlestick Patterns – The spinning top candlestick pattern is a chart pattern that appears on a candlestick chart. It is called a spinning top pattern because it looks like a top, with a small body and long wicks or shadows on both sides. Spinning top candlesticks are considered to be a sign of indecision or a lack of momentum in the market. To form a spinning top pattern, the body of the candlestick should be small and the wicks or shadows should be long, indicating that there was significant buying and selling activity, but the price ended up closing at or near the open. The color of the candlestick does not matter, as spinning tops can be either white or black. It is important to note that spinning top candlesticks are not a standalone signal and should be confirmed by other technical indicators or chart patterns before making any trading decisions. It is also important to consider the overall trend and context of the market when interpreting the meaning of a spinning top pattern.

28 Falling Three Methods Candlestick Patterns – The falling three methods candlestick pattern is a bearish reversal pattern that occurs after an uptrend. It is called a falling three methods pattern because it consists of five consecutive candlesticks, with the first three being long white or green candlesticks that represent an uptrend and the last two being long black or red candlesticks that indicate a downtrend. To form a falling three methods pattern, the first three candlesticks should be long white or green candlesticks that open above the close of the previous candlestick and close at or near their highs. The fourth candlestick should be a black or red candlestick that opens within the body of the previous white candlestick and closes below the midpoint of the white candlestick’s body. The fifth candlestick should also be a black or red candlestick that opens below the close of the fourth candlestick and closes below the low of the fourth candlestick. This indicates that there was a strong shift in sentiment from bullish to bearish, with sellers being able to push the price down significantly from the open. Like the other candlestick patterns mentioned, the falling three methods pattern is not a standalone signal and should be confirmed by other technical indicators or chart patterns before making any trading decisions. It is also important to consider the overall trend and context of the market when interpreting the meaning of a falling three methods pattern.

29 Rising Three Methods Candlestick Patterns – The rising three methods candlestick pattern is a bullish reversal pattern that occurs after a downtrend. It is called a rising three methods pattern because it consists of five consecutive candlesticks, with the first three being long black or red candlesticks that represent a downtrend and the last two being long white or green candlesticks that indicate an uptrend. To form a rising three methods pattern, the first three candlesticks should be long black or red candlesticks that open below the close of the previous candlestick and close at or near their lows. The fourth candlestick should be a white or green candlestick that opens within the body of the previous black candlestick and closes above the midpoint of the black candlestick’s body. The fifth candlestick should also be a white or green candlestick that opens above the close of the fourth candlestick and closes above the high of the fourth candlestick. This indicates that there was a strong shift in sentiment from bearish to bullish, with buyers being able to push the price up significantly from the open. Like the other candlestick patterns mentioned, the rising three methods pattern is not a standalone signal and should be confirmed by other technical indicators or chart patterns before making any trading decisions. It is also important to consider the overall trend and context of the market when interpreting the meaning of a rising three methods pattern.

30 Upside Tasuki Candlestick Patterns – The upside tasuki gap candlestick pattern is a bullish reversal pattern that occurs after a downtrend. It is called an upside tasuki gap pattern because it consists of two candlesticks that gap up from the previous candlestick and form a “tasuki,” which is a type of sash worn around the waist in traditional Japanese clothing. To form an upside tasuki gap pattern, the first candlestick should be a long black or red candlestick that represents a downtrend. The second candlestick should be a white or green candlestick that opens above the high of the previous black candlestick and closes above the midpoint of the black candlestick’s body. This indicates that there was a shift in sentiment from bearish to bullish, with buyers being able to push the price up significantly from the open. It is important to note that the upside tasuki gap pattern is not a standalone signal and should be confirmed by other technical indicators or chart patterns before making any trading decisions. It is also important to consider the overall trend and context of the market when interpreting the meaning of an upside tasuki gap pattern.

31 Downside Tasuki Candlestick Patterns – The downside tasuki gap candlestick pattern is a bearish reversal pattern that occurs after an uptrend. It is called a downside tasuki gap pattern because it consists of two candlesticks that gap down from the previous candlestick and form a “tasuki,” which is a type of sash worn around the waist in traditional Japanese clothing. To form a downside tasuki gap pattern, the first candlestick should be a long white or green candlestick that represents an uptrend. The second candlestick should be a black or red candlestick that opens below the low of the previous white candlestick and closes below the midpoint of the white candlestick’s body. This indicates that there was a shift in sentiment from bullish to bearish, with sellers being able to push the price down significantly from the open. It is important to note that the downside tasuki gap pattern is not a standalone signal and should be confirmed by other technical indicators or chart patterns before making any trading decisions. It is also important to consider the overall trend and context of the market when interpreting the meaning of a downside tasuki gap pattern.

32 Mat Hold Candlestick Patterns – The mat hold candlestick pattern is a chart pattern that appears on a candlestick chart. It is called a mat hold pattern because it looks like a mat or a platform, with the body of the candlestick being small and the wicks or shadows being long, indicating that there was significant buying and selling activity, but the price ended up closing at or near the open. Mat hold candlesticks are considered to be a sign of indecision or a lack of momentum in the market. To form a mat hold pattern, the body of the candlestick should be small and the wicks or shadows should be long, indicating that there was significant buying and selling activity, but the price ended up closing at or near the open. The color of the candlestick does not matter, as mat holds can be either white or black. It is important to note that mat hold candlesticks are not a standalone signal and should be confirmed by other technical indicators or chart patterns before making any trading decisions. It is also important to consider the overall trend and context of the market when interpreting the meaning of a mat hold pattern.

33 Rising Window Candlestick Patterns – The rising window candlestick pattern is a bullish reversal pattern that occurs after a downtrend. It is called a rising window pattern because it looks like a window, with the body of the second candlestick rising up through the gap between the first and second candlesticks. To form a rising window pattern, the first candlestick should be a long black or red candlestick that represents a downtrend. The second candlestick should be a white or green candlestick that opens above the high of the previous black candlestick and closes above the midpoint of the black candlestick’s body. This creates a gap between the two candlesticks, with the body of the second candlestick rising up through the gap. This indicates that there was a shift in sentiment from bearish to bullish, with buyers being able to push the price up significantly from the open. It is important to note that the rising window pattern is not a standalone signal and should be confirmed by other technical indicators or chart patterns before making any trading decisions. It is also important to consider the overall trend and context of the market when interpreting the meaning of a rising window pattern.

34 Falling Window Candlestick Patterns – The falling window candlestick pattern is a bearish reversal pattern that occurs after an uptrend. It is called a falling window pattern because it looks like a window, with the body of the second candlestick falling down through the gap between the first and second candlesticks.To form a falling window pattern, the first candlestick should be a long white or green candlestick that represents an uptrend. The second candlestick should be a black or red candlestick that opens below the low of the previous white candlestick and closes below the midpoint of the white candlestick’s body. This creates a gap between the two candlesticks, with the body of the second candlestick falling down through the gap. This indicates that there was a shift in sentiment from bullish to bearish, with sellers being able to push the price down significantly from the open. It is important to note that the falling window pattern is not a standalone signal and should be confirmed by other technical indicators or chart patterns before making any trading decisions. It is also important to consider the overall trend and context of the market when interpreting the meaning of a falling window pattern.

35 High Wave Candlestick Patterns – The high wave candlestick pattern is a chart pattern that appears on a candlestick chart. It is called a high wave pattern because it looks like a wave, with a long white or green candlestick followed by a long black or red candlestick, then another long white or green candlestick. High wave candlesticks are considered to be a sign of indecision or a lack of momentum in the market. To form a high wave pattern, the first candlestick should be a long white or green candlestick that opens above the close of the previous candlestick and closes at or near its high. The second candlestick should be a long black or red candlestick that opens below the close of the previous white candlestick and closes below the midpoint of the white candlestick’s body. The third candlestick should be a long white or green candlestick that opens above the close of the previous black candlestick and closes at or near its high. This creates a wave-like pattern, with the price fluctuating between two extremes. It is important to note that high wave candlesticks are not a standalone signal and should be confirmed by other technical indicators or chart patterns before making any trading decisions. It is also important to consider the overall trend and context of the market when interpreting the meaning of a high wave pattern.

Leave a Comment